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How To Deal With Insubordinate Staff for First Time Business Owners

How To Deal With Insubordinate Staff for First Time Business Owners
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Business owners, when you first hire staff for your business, one of the most important steps is laying the ground rules.

However, it’s only natural that certain rules or policies are stepped over by staff, and as a person in authority, it’s vital that we put our foot down when an employee is out of line.

For first-time business owners like myself, I struggled with this.  Simply because I was so concerned with not wanting to come off as being unreasonable and illogical. I wanted to exercise judgment wisely.

Many a time I would find myself feeling guilty when I reprimanded a staff or when I was forced to stand my ground. But there are a couple of things that as a business owner and leader that we must remind ourselves, especially being a first-timer in such a situation.

Here is how I dealt with insubordinate staff for first-time business owners in five steps:

Also, read:

7 Habits Every Small Business Owner Should Develop

Get Comfortable with Being in Authority

Playing the role of an authoritative figure can be tricky and rather challenging, this is especially so if you are too confrontational or the total opposite, confrontation phobic. Bringing a balance requires you to first be comfortable with your role as a business owner.

You will have to learn how to deal with situations where:

  • The people working for you aren’t performing in the way that you need
  • Be comfortable with raising the issue and correcting their behavior
  • Setting consequences if it persists, and then enforcing those consequences,
  • And doing it all in a way that’s direct, straightforward, and fair (not defensive or insecure or overly harsh).

These are essential pieces of being an effective business owner. Learn in advance how to deal with possible situations that you may be likely to encounter later in the business.

Some examples of conflicts that you might have to deal with include; handling an employee that is leaving, employees who are bad in dealing with customers, employees who are trying really hard but just not doing a good job, employees who do not follow through on things you ask them to do.

Eliminate The Feeling of Guilt
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