Entrepreneurship

7 Successful Indian Female Entrepreneurs Who Broke the Glass Ceiling

Gone are the days when thinking about successful entrepreneurs brought the picture of a handsome young man in a well-fitted suit to mind. Now, women entrepreneurs are making their way to success in India and are achieving the milestones many men could only hope for. Here you can learn about 7 successful female Indian entrepreneurs who dared to do something different and made a difference. 1. Falguni Nayar, Nykaa It takes guts to resign from a comfortable job and start something of your own. Falguni Nayar who started beauty e-commerce giant Nykaa, clearly possessed the courage to forge her own path and destiny. She resigned from the job of Managing Director of Kotak Mahindra and kicked off the operations of Nykaa. Falguni started this business because she wanted customers to get honest and ...

From Design Agency Head to Successful Ice Cream Treats Founder – Creamier & Sunday Folks

Cafés and dessert shops are popular hangout spots for people of all ages. There’s nothing quite like ice cream and coffee on a sunny afternoon – what more when it’s of the homemade sort. Creamier Handcrafted Ice Cream & Coffee and Sunday Folks are no strangers to the café scene in Singapore. Despite the long queues and wait-times, customers flock to the cosy outlets for a whiff of the handmade ice creams (and delicious waffles). To understand the success behind the café’s operations, we reached out to Khoh Wan Chin, co-founder of Creamier Handcrafted Ice Cream & Coffee and Sunday Folks. How It All Began Creamier was first founded in 2011 by Khoh Wan Chin, Victor Lim and Audrey Wang. The enterprise sought to fulfil their vision and passion in the business. Previously, Wa...

From Small Business to Empires: How These 4 Malaysian F&B Companies Made It

Malaysians are a lucky lot when it comes to food. Due to the multi-racial aspect of our country, we are spoilt for choice with a culinary divergence that few countries can brag. Chinese, Indian, Malay – you name it, we have it. Last week, we wrote an article that identified 3 Singaporean hawkers and their rise to international success and branding. Today, we will look at the Malaysian equivalents of these entrepreneurial spirits. From their humble beginnings to becoming multi-million-dollar franchises, these local and recognisable brands have a story to inspire just about anyone out there. Read on to see how These 4 Malaysian Small Town Businesses Achieved International Fame. Ramly Burger

4 Powerful Ways To Beat the Burnout for Singaporean Business Owners

A burnout can occur when you least expect it. Perhaps you’ve overworked yourself. You’re juggling too many roles. You’re handling more than you can manage. You’re brain is constantly on over-drive and you’ve worked yourself to the brink of exhaustion. It’s not uncommon to hear this in Singapore. In a time and age where we’re constantly pushing ourselves to strive and work for more, a burnout can occur at any time, anywhere. Or perhaps you’re one of those who’s on the edge of experiencing a burn out and you’re well aware of this. And that’s why you’ve found yourself here. Reading this very article. Well here’s something to cheer you up! This article is meant to tell you how to prevent yourself from a burnout. If stress, worry...

How These 3 Singaporean Entrepreneurs Went From Hawkers to Running an F&B Empire

Humble beginnings provide a foundation for business growth. Sometimes, a rags-to-riches story can be warming and inspiring to those of us who are still looking for a way to define our success. Read on to see how these 3 hawkers made an empire from their humble eateries. 1. Paradise Group Paradise Group first started out as ‘Seafood Paradise’. The restaurant poised as a diner’s paradise for Oriental cuisine, traces its’ roots to a humble 25-seater eatery in Defu Lane. Initially, Eldwin Chua started out with managing his grandfather’s coffeeshop operations. His duties consisted of running the drinks stall and learning how to brew coffee. In 2002, at the age of 25 years old, Eldwin was given the chance to take over his grandfather’s coffeeshop. He took over with an assistant chef ...

Millennials Will Love These 3 Things About Your Restaurant

Welcome to the Age of Millennials! Here, everything is fast-paced, trendy and insta-worthy. Whether or not we like it, Millennials make up a large part of the population. As restaurant owners, this means that we need to adapt for this audience if we want to stay afloat. The Millennial • Age: 16 – 34 • Open minded and multi-racial • Most have social media profiles • They are the most educated generation in our history As generations come and go, so do traditions. We need to embrace a new way of doing things if we are to reach out to this audience. Here are 3 ways you can engage your Millennial customers better: 1. Taste The Trends

6 Facts About Myanmar’s Tycoon “Pepsi” Thein Tun

At 82, Thein Tun is one of Myanmar’s most venerable tycoons. His company Myanmar Golden Star (MGS) is regarded as one of the ten strongest businesses in the country. MGS is best known for introducing Pepsi into the Burmese Market in the 90’s. There are a lot of good take-aways from this down-to-earth businessman’s attitude to life, so here are 6 interesting facts about Thein Tun. 1. A Pioneer Of His Generation

4 Habits of Successful Businesswomen

Many successful women get ahead of their peers by being  subtly aggressive. Underneath the charming smiles and gentle humility is really a take-charge fiery attitude that drives it all. These 4 tips will help set you on the path to success as a businesswoman who is looking to increase productivity and profits. 1. Working On A Network Successful businesswomen take every opportunity they can to network. Networking helps you align yourself with the right communities that are beneficial to your career. Every person is a chance to learn or try something new. This extends to relationships that are both casual and career.   Build your business relationships steadily. Doing so ensures long-term sustainability with clients, customers and associates. If possible, try and keep in touch personally by ...

Sole Proprietorship In India – A Quick Guide to Getting Started

भारत में एकमात्र स्वामित्व स्थापित करने के बारे में जानने के लिए अपने फेसबुक या लिंक्डइन खाते से लॉगिन करें Login with your Facebook or LinkedIn account to find about setting up a Sole Proprietorship In India

A Filipino’s Guide to Surviving the First Year of Restaurant Business

I belong to a group of pioneer restaurant owners. Although the restaurant landscape has changed since we entered it, it is still no easy task to open a restaurant and the first year is by far the hardest to survive. These are a few tips that we used to tide over our business in the first year. According to a study by The Perry Group study most restaurants in the Philippines close during their first year of operation. 70% of those that make it past the first year close their doors in the next three to five years. 90% of the restaurants that are still operating past the five-year mark will stay in business for a minimum of 10 years. So as a restaurant business owner, what can you do to reach that 90% group? 1. Think and Breathe Like an Entrepreneur We believe that one thing that many restaur...

These 2 Mum’s Ran a Malaysian Alterations Empire for 16 Years

Before the year 2002, the few ways one could get their clothes altered in Kuala Lumpur after a shopping spree was to drive up to their neighbourhood alteration shop operated by a part-time seamstress in her home. While there was nothing particularly wrong with the way that alterations were being conducted, Za Altera founders Cheryl Cheah and Susan Liew realized that there was a huge gap in the market for such needs. 

The One Advice that Successful Restaurant Owners Won’t Tell You

As a restaurant owner myself, I started my entrepreneurial journey fresh with rose-coloured glasses. In other words, I was young, optimistic, and had fire in my blood to concur the F&B industry. Basically, I was naïve and idealistic. After the first 6 months of running my restaurant, I was ready to throw in the towel. I had designed my restaurant, thinking it would appeal to millennial, crafted out my menu, hired staff, sourced my inventory to making sure we had the freshest ingredients every day, and sourced for food bloggers to promote my restaurant. Instead, I found myself having to manage everything. From scrubbing down the kitchen daily, grinding the coffee, de-shelling the prawns, serving the food, wiping tables, polishing the floors, taking photos of the food on my own, washing ...

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